FORCED HUMILITY

Each morning I wake up at the crack of dawn, work with my caregiver for several hours to get ready for my day, and then pump out work for around 10 to 12 hours each day, continue to work my caregiver for afternoon activities, then rest, repeat, and start again in the morning.

At the ripe young age of 10 years old I attended Catholic boarding school in London, England.  I’ve been conditioned to work harder, smarter, more efficiently, and just keep going.  Don’t get me wrong, I have my fair share of fun, but hard work has been ingrained in me as long as I can remember.

My definition of work has changed over the years and now encompasses spending my day working professionally, advocating for those who can’t advocate for themselves, working on trying to build a large social media following in order to affect greater change, and find some kind of balance in my personal life.  I’m not always brilliant at it and I know there are so many other people in life trying to juggle balance too. Continue reading

Christopher Reeve Foundation – We are Stronger Together

I’m super honored to have partnered with the Christopher Reeve Foundation as a guest blogger on my recent Health Insurance Appeals battle.

I am presently engaged in another battle with my health insurance company on getting a medically necessary specialized shower chair approved!  Stay tuned for that one … Events unfolding as we speak!

Here’s the first installment of the article and the second one should be out later this month.

https://www.christopherreeve.org/blog/life-after-paralysis/health-insurance-denial-appeals-process-you-are-your-own-best-advocate

 

 

Health Insurance Company Vs. The Individual (0-1) – A Fight to Remember

After a long and arduous 7-month road of winding adventure of denials, appeals, and out of the box advocacy techniques … I’m proud to announce I took receipt of my new power wheelchair yesterday with the seat elevator I was denied.

I outlined several detailed articles in Push Living Magazine (article 1, article 2, article 3) on the labyrinth I had to make my way through during this process.

I went to the local media and was able to land a written piece by News & Observer and a small TV segment by ABC 11’s Diane Wilson, investigative reporter, on the battle I underwent.

During this pandemic the most unlikely of things happened. I developed a laser focus and passionate advocacy mission all the topic of health insurance denials for medically necessary equipment.

Whether you have Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance, there is a process, albeit tedious more often than not, where you can navigate your way through the maze of red tape to overturn an insurance denial. You have Rights!

Read the rest on Push Living Magazine: https://pushliving.com/health-insurance-company-vs-the-individual-0-1-advocacy-101/

Covid-19 and Spinal Cord Injury Walk into a Bar …

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Over the last several months I’ve connected with friends from around the globe and have observed a wide array of different reactions on how they have been dealing with the pandemic during lock-down, and how their normal lives have changed to date.

This pandemic is not going anywhere anytime soon, and as such, many people have had to change their daily routines such as working from home, wearing a mask to places of business, limiting their movement in social gatherings, etc.  Leaving aside the economic impact, I’ve been curious as to how people have been coping mentally.  More specifically, I have so many friends who have also sustained a spinal cord injury (SCI) as well as many able-bodied friends.

I’ve noticed a stark contrast in how many of my SCI friends have been coping with the pandemic versus my friends with two working legs.  Personally, I can relate more closely my SCI friends on this front.  The pandemic has caused me to push the pause button on my life since taking that fateful shallow water dive 10 years ago this August.

Many of us with SCI live in social isolation on a regular basisContinue reading